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Make Your Historic Home Energy Efficient!

  
  
  

A historic home has numerous perks for its owners; original hardwood floors, high ceilings, intricate detail, and the fact that you have, and are living in, your very own piece of history. However, with the good also comes the bad; poorly insulated walls, air leaks in windows and around doors, and less than perfect water pressure.

Maintaining an energy efficient home not only saves electricity, gas, and water, which in turn saves you money on your utility bills, it also increases the value of your home and makes it safer and healthier to live in. What can you do to maximize the positives and minimize the negatives? For starters, it is important to know that there are many things that you can do on your own, without the help of a professional. However, it is a good idea to get an instrumented energy audit done by a professional energy auditor before getting started, just so you get an idea of what you are in for!

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 Here are 4 of the most common problems with historic houses and the (sometimes) easy solutions to fix them:

-Problem: Poor Heat Distribution, High Gas Bill

-Solution: Try a combination of a few techniques such as air sealing, adding attic and wall insulation, and adjusting your equipment controls manually. These different improvements will be sure to keep your family thoroughly warm and your wallet happy. One client of ours saved enough in heating bills in just one winter to cover the cost of insulating their attic with spray foam. A one year payback!  Many states now have very attractive rebate programs available too. For more information on the right way to insulate your old house, download our eBook on the topic.

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-Problem: Drafty Windows, High Electric/Gas Bill

-Solution: We almost always recommend repairing and  weatherstripping original windows instead of replacing them. By adding the right weatherstripping, installing storm shutters and using them when it is appropriate, and hanging interior blinds, curtains, and shades, your drafty windows may no longer be an issue. This will seal in the heat in the winter and the A/C in the summer, thereby saving you money in your utility bills every season.

-Problem: Weak Water Pressure, High Water Bill

-Solution: Try replacing low quality shower heads with low-flow, high efficient models. Also, to ensure there are no leaks in the pipes, have them inspected annually after the coldest winter months or replace them all together if you do not feel comfortable with their quality. Not only will this rest your nerves, it will save you money in the long haul if a pipe is to burst!  By the way, we're available to do annual inspections on plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems- as well as roofing, gutters, and many other parts of your house.

describe the image-Problem: Poor Lighting, High Electric Bill

-Solution: It makes sense, in some cases, to replace incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent lights (or CFLs for short!). But some of them are slow to turn on and don't provide a great deal of light, in my opinion.  Fortunately, newer technology is on the scene. LED lighting has come a long way in the past few years. I replaced the recessed lights in my own kitchen with LED inserts and have been very happy with them. They use a fraction of the energy that incandescents use.

 Of course, these are the micro- steps you can take to save some energy costs. Most utilities over free energy audits. If you're in Massachusetts we can point you in the right direction. Quick tip though:  most of these consultants will recommend replacing your old windows. Don't believe them!  

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

Renovation of an Historic Carriage House

  
  
  

As renovation contractors, we love it when we have the opportunity to take a neglected old building and - with the help of dedicated clients and a good designer- give it a new life.

When I first visited this carriage house in Brookline, MA, I was intrigued by its beautiful exterior but quite taken back by the unpleasant interior. Prior owners had converted it into a rental unit but by the time our clients bought the property, the interior was in disrepair. It was dark, cramped, and felt quite damp and musty.

Brookline MA carriage house resized 600                                                                             exterior prior to construction

The project architects, Meyer & Meyer Architects, had a great vision: they determined that creating a large opening between the first and second floors would bring much more light into the living areas and result in a more spacious feeling. 

The main challenge was the calendar; our clients needed to be living in the carriage house just 10 weeks after the start of construction. When the interior demolition was carried out, the engineering was quickly done and the re-construction began immediately. Because time was short the project team- architects, homeowners, and us - met on a regular basis to review any new issues and to put the finishing touches on details (cabinetry, fixtures, etc). Good communication is the key to any successful renovation, but it becomes even more critical when the schedule is tight. This was a "fast track" project, meaning that construction began before all of the design work was completed. So while we were doing the interior framing, key elements such as the kitchen cabinetry and the spiral staircase were being drawn.

Prior to construction....

historic carriage house interior resized 600 

During the framing phase.... the opening between floors has been created.

carriage house interior framing resized 600

The building had some serious structural defects and the desire to create the large opening between floors only added to its structural needs. But by the fifth week we had completed the structural work, the rough wiring, HVAC, and plumbing had been installed, and we had all of our rough inspections. Halfway there! Another week or so and the spray foam insulation and board and plaster were done.

During the spray foam installation....

spray foam insulation resized 600

Cabinets, counters, wood floors, tile, interior trim and painting were all done in the final month of the project. The project came to a crescendo on the day that the spiral stairs arrived. Ideally they would have been installed much earlier in the project, but because of the compressed schedule, the stairs didn't show up until the final week. Our friends at Deathwish Piano Movers quickly lifted them in through the second floor French door opening and we dropped them into place. Phew!

Here's the completed project... what do you think?

 

 

Brookline MA renovation

Renovated carriage house interior

The interior is flooded with light now. The light walls show off the new white oak floors, the dark beams, and the spiral stairs.

historic renovation Brookline MA

Brookline renovation

We painted one bedroom wall with chalkboard paint.

Brookline MA historic renovation

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

Project focus: Our new barn project

  
  
  

I posted a few months back about a new barn that we've been building in Weston, MA. Well, apart from the landscaping and a final coat of paint on the exterior, this project was wrapped up this week. 

As you can see below, there was a LOT of stone work involved. Our masons did a fantastic job of installing the fieldstone veneer over the concrete walls. They also built the stone chimney and fireplace.  The timber frame and the wall and roof panels were installed by Bensonwood, the superb timber framers and housewrights from New Hampshire. They also designed the barn. This is our second collaboration with Bensonwood (we built a new house with them in Harvard, MA) and it was just as enjoyable as the first.

Let us know what you think!

 


Weston, MA barn

new barn Weston, MA

The roofing is standing seam prepainted aluminum.  It will be a no maintenance, trouble free roof for many, many years.  The glass doors in the porch fold, accordian style, so that the porch can be completely open to the outdoors. The siding was prefinished pine tongue and groove boards, installed vertically.

 

The wood floors are reclaimed heart pine. 

Barn Weston MA resized 600

Mass barn resized 600

 

Landmark barn Weston MAbarn porch Weston MA resized 600

The landscape construction will begin in a few weeks.  When that work is done, the temporary stairs will be replaced with a permanent set.  

If you have a barn - or house - project on your mind, we're always happy to talk. At Landmark Services, we like to say that we bring new life to old buildings and, on projects like this, old life to new ones.

Similar to this:

A historic barn that we renovated in Milton, MA

 

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

A Week in the Life of a Renovation Company

  
  
  

Just thought I'd give you a feel for the variety of projects that we're working on these days. All of the photos were taken within the past week or two of projects in which we are the General Contractor. 

We're about halfway through a renovation and addition to a cute 1930s house in Marshfield, MA. Here's a view of the exterior showing the cedar shingle roof nearing completion. The gambrel-roofed section at the right is new. This is a collaboration with Frank Shirley Architects.

Marshfield Ma renovation resized 600

 

Installation of another wood roof is the last step in a carriage house renovation in Brookline, MA. We gutted and completely renovated this late 19th century carriage house in a little over 10 weeks. Quite the feat, if I do say so myself. The traditional exterior stands in contrast to the sleeker interior. The architects are Meyer & Meyer

Brookline MA carriage house resized 600

Brookline carriage house resized 600

Work continues on our barn project in Weston, MA.  Most of the vertical board siding has been installed and the metal roof work is underway. Bensonwood supplied the timber frame and the exterior shell. 

barn siding MA resized 600metal barn roof resized 600

The Norfolk grange was built as a church in the 1860s and was converted into a Grange hall some time later. The Grange was the beneficiary of a Community Preservation Act grant and we are using those funds to make the building accessible and also to restore as much of it as possible. We're building two small additions and a wheelchair ramp. Later in the project we'll restore the windows, repair the plaster, paint the interior and more.

Norfolk Grange resized 600

Another of our crews has been working on an 18th century house in Littleton, MA.  Once the site of one of the largest dairy farms in the area, this house has endured a major fire and a fair amount by previous owners. Fortunately, the current owners are making a major investment to ensure the building will be in good condition for many years to come. Working with architect Deane Rykerson, we are renovating the entire exterior:  new windows, roofing, siding and trim.  Major deterioration of the sills and other structural elements were uncovered and subsequently repaired.

Littleton MA historic renovation 

And finally, we're just getting underway on renovations to a beautiful historic estate in Westford, MA.  Built just after 1900, this 10,000 square foot home will see extensive renovations over the next two years. The first phase includes a kitchen renovation, new heating and cooling, major electrical upgrades and probably new roofing.

historic house Westwood MA resized 600

Phew!  So that's a snapshot of the projects that we're working on these days.  Look for individual articles about each of these projects in the weeks and months to come. We're excited about the work we do and the opportunity to work on so many interesting projects. Let us know what you're working on. We're always glad to talk to folks about their upcoming projects.

 


 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

Project focus: A New Timber Frame Barn

  
  
  

We're known primarily as Old House Renovation guys. Maybe that's why we have so much fun when we get an opportunity to do some new construction from the ground up. A year or so ago we teamed up with the timber frame company Bensonwood to build a new house out in Harvard, MA. Right now we're teaming up with them again to build a new barn in Weston, MA.

Bensonwood has an incredible high-tech factory in Walpole, NH.  Their architects send CAD files to huge shaping machines.  The CAD files are translated into instructions to cutting heads that precisely cut the timbers to the sizes and shapes needed to produce the posts, beams, and other components that comprise the timber frame. They also build floor, wall, and roof sections in the factory. While they're making the frame in their shop, our people are on site doing the excavation and concrete work required to get the foundation ready. In this particular case we had to blast through some tough ledge before the foundation walls could be formed.

As you can see from the photo below, the concrete foundation on this project will be concealed by a beautiful stone veneer. 

stone veneer resized 600

With the foundation ready, the timber frame and prefab panels were shipped to the site. Late last week the floor panels were installed onto the foundation.  This week a team of timber framers - comprised partly of BensonWood guys and partly our own carpenters - pegged the timbers together and a crane lifted the sections into place. Wall and roof panels also get installed with the assistance of the crane. When the shell is in place, the crane will leave and we will carry out the rest of the work: exterior trim and siding, mechanical systems, plaster, interior trim, etc.

Here's a shot of the timber frame lying flat on the floor prior to being lifted in place. 

timber frame

The main sections of framing (called "bents") were lifted into place by the end of the first day of framing, as seen below.

mexicobarn 042 resized 600

timber frame detail

By the second day, the barn is really beginning to take shape. I'll do a couple of follow up posts in coming weeks and months so you can see how this barn turns out.

MA timber frame barn resized 600

So, hey, maybe we should be known as the new and old house or the new-old house guys or old new house guys or- well you get my drift. Be sure to come back in a few weeks to check out the progress on this project!

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

More innovation in home construction products...

  
  
  

While we're talking about innovative products I thought I'd mention another pretty cool new idea.  A company called Trufig has invented a line of wall switches and outlets that can be flush mounted with any surface, and therefore made to almost disappear.

Here's a typical scenario:  if you've ever renovated a kitchen you know that the electrical code requires a LOT of outlets along the backsplash area. A lot of people may never use many of these outlets but are stuck looking at them (unless you mount them on the underside of the upper cabinets as I did in my own kitchen). With Trufig's products, these outlets can be installed perfectly flush with, for example, your stone backsplash. In order to do this, the stone must be laser cut to fit the Trufig outlet.  The rectangle of stone that is removed can be given to a decorative painter who paints the Trufig faceplate to replicate the pattern of the stone that was removed, as shown below.

 Trufig outlet resized 600

Now suppose that you didn't even want to look at this code-required outlet?  Simple.  Give a blank plate to the decorative painter and the outlet virtually disappears.

This system can also be used to install plugs and switches in wood, drywall, plaster, or most other surfaces that you can think of.  They also have products that can allow other devices to be mounted flush : heating or cooling air registers, iPads, speakers, etc. 

Trufig outlets resized 600

Making electrical devices less visible is a great step forward, particularly for many of the historic renovation projects that we carry out.  Standard plugs and switches can be visually distractive in many historic settings and I'm sure we'll be looking at incorporating this system in some of our upcoming projects.  I'll let you know how it goes.

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

Product feature: A thermostat that learns

  
  
  

Since I started in this business as a renovation and restoration contractor, I have tried to look for new ways of approaching old problems.   I love when fresh ideas are brought to the residential construction business.

Here's one such break-through.  A couple of engineers who helped Apple develop the iPod has designed - and is now selling - a "smart" thermostat that has the potential to help homes and businesses save an enormous amount of heating and cooling energy. 

The product is called the Nest and - as with Apple's products - it was designed with a simple user interface but with incredible behind-the-scenes intelligence.  (And, yes, I'm an Apple fan, having used their products for over 20 years now).  

Three things make this stand out from any other thermostat on the market.

First, it's good looking.  The Nest is the one on the right, a typical setback thermostat is shown to the left.  What a difference! The old one has buttons, dials, and sliding switches, plus a fold-down panel that reveals even more buttons.  What a mess!

setback thermostat resized 600

Nest   The Learning Thermostat   Living With Nest resized 600

 

Second, the Nest is simple to set up and use.  When first installed, it asks you some simple questions which helps to set it up.  Have you ever tried to program one of the old fashioned thermostats?  Confusing and unreliable are the terms that come to mind. 

Nest thermostat

But the major difference between the Nest and any other thermostat available is that it's smart. It learns your habits and your preferences.  If you turn the heat up in the morning, Nest will remember this and turn it up for you even if you forget to do it one day. It has built-in motion sensors and so it will turn the heat (or AC) down when no one is around. A compatible iPhone app allows you to adjust the Nest even when you're on the road. And the Nest connects wirelessly to the internet and allow you to actually track the energy savings online. The WIFI connection also allows it to monitor local temperatures and adjust its settings accordingly. Awesome. 

While expensive compared to other thermostats (about $250), the ease-of-use means that this product will actually save you money, unlike most traditional thermostats. Studies have shown that most programmable thermostats are never actually, you know, programmed because the interfaces are so confusing. Since the Nest is so easy to set up, it will reduce your heating and cooling costs every day.

I'm thrilled to see such well-thought design and engineering brought into the home improvement market. Sadly most of the true innovation in heating and cooling systems, appliances, and plumbing fixtures these days seems to be happening in Europe. I am hopeful that this product will provide an incentive to other American engineers and product developers to show that we can still produce exciting products here as well. 

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

Historic houses: Beauty through imperfection

  
  
  

Several times a year I am asked to look at old houses for potential buyers.  I'll walk through the house and give them my opinion on the condition of the house, the feasibility of renovations and additions, ballpark costs, etc. 

I'll never forget when I made such a visit to a late 18th century Cape that a young couple was considering. The home still had many of its original features, including the wide pine floors, door, interior trim, etc. One beautiful feature was a large raised panel situated over the parlor fireplace. It was crafted from a single board that was probably 26-28 inches wide. The carpenter had hand-planed the surface and had used molding planes to make the raised panel edge detail. It was a great example of period carpentry.

"Can you sand that down to get it smooth?" asked the potential buyer.

"Excuse me?" I said, startled.

"Yeah, it's kind of wavy.  Shouldn't it be flat and smooth?"

So I explained how the piece was a product of the available tools of its time period and that to sand it smooth would be to desecrate a valuable architectural element.

"Yeah, but its not flat!"

The point is, the beauty and character that we love about old houses is largely a result of the "imperfections", if you will, of the visible surfaces. There is an honesty to this work. The 18th carpenter had hand tools at his disposal and shaped every piece of wood in the house by hand. Surfaces that would be hidden (sheathing boards, the underside of floor boards, etc) were left rough. Prominent surfaces (door panels, window and door casings, etc) were hand planed to a finish that was, indeed, slightly wavy (the "waves" caused by the blade of the plane). But each plane mark is a witness to the hand that built the house and, to me, this work stands up with equal elegance to the finest machine produced finish carpentry of  our time.

Similarly, sometimes people want to achieve perfectly flat walls and ceilings in their old houses despite the fact that 18th and 19th century plaster work was typically not perfectly flat. Old plaster was built up in several layers over wooden lathe and the ripples of the lathe and the slight skip of the trowel give these old surfaces a pleasing texture. When possible, we urge our clients to have us repair, rather than replace, historic plaster work.

If you live in an old house, take a moment to look around. What examples can you identify that exhibit "imperfections" that you have come to love? 

 

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

Renovating your home? Watch out for the hidden costs!

  
  
  

From time to time I see projects tabled or postponed due to budgetary reasons. It's unfortunate at any point in the process but it's particularly heartbreaking when the clients have spent many months and many thousands of dollars on design fees, only to learn that the beautiful project depicted in the architect's drawings will cost much more than they are able or willing to invest.

Sometimes the project doesn't get off the ground because the architect has simply drawn too large a project for the client's budget. It's easy for all parties involved - homeowners, architects and, yes, even contractors- to allow their enthusiasm for the project to get carried away. When this happens the scope increases and, of course, so does the cost.

Other projects go off the rails because the clients were unaware of the all of the costs involved in a construction project. People sometimes get fixated on just the construction costs and underestimate the other expenses. 

So what are the hidden costs of construction? Many people use the terms "soft" and "hard" costs to define the two main categories of costs. Soft costs are all of the costs not associated with actual tangible construction. Hard costs are the direct construction costs.

Here's a list of the typical costs in residential construction. Your project may not include all of these, of course, but it there may be one or two things listed here that you haven't considered.

 

Soft Costs:

DESIGN FEES:

Architect

Landscape architect

Interior designer

Kitchen designer

ENGINEERING

Structural engineer

HVAC engineer 

Land surveyor

Civil Engineer

Wetlands consultant

RELOCATION COSTS

Temporary rental housing (do you need to move out during construction?)

Moving and storage costs

MISC.

Legal fees (e.g. contract review)

Accounting (e.g. if any renewable energy tax credits are involved)

Financing (if construction or home equity loans are involved)

 

Hard Costs:

In addition to the well-understood costs associated with demolition, framing, roofing, etc, please consider the following.

SITE WORK:

Hay bales and silt fence

Site clearing

Tree removal or other tree work

Landscape construction (driveways, walks, patios)

Landscaping (plantings, lawns, irrigation systems, lighting)

Septic systems

Drainage systems 

Utility hookups (water, sewer, gas, electric)

Fencing

CONSTRUCTION ADD-ONS:

AV systems (home theaters, built-in music systems, etc)

Home automation

Swimming pools

Outdoor kitchens

POST-CONSTRUCTION COST:

Furniture

Carpets, rugs

Window treatments

 

We'll talk more about some of these items in more detail in an upcoming blog post.  In the meantime, if you are planning a renovation, addition, or new house, please take a few minutes to create a spreadsheet showing all of the potential costs. You'll thank me later.

Let me know if there are things that I've missed that should be on this list!

 


 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

Dealing with Lead Paint on Historic Houses

  
  
  

Most people have probably heard by now about the new rules put into place by the EPA concerning lead paint and renovations. The goal of the rules is to increase awareness of the danger of lead paint and decrease the risk of harm to occupants of old homes where lead paint is present. The rules apply to projects that involve renovation or painting of houses built prior to 1978 (when lead paint was banned). 

As a historic restoration contracting company here in Massachusetts, almost all of the buildings that we work on contain lead paint so we need to pay close attention to the requirements.

The rules, known as the RRP (Repair, Renovate, and Paint) guidelines have four main components.  The first is notification. Contractors must notify their clients to the dangers of lead paint. This is done by giving them a copy of the EPA's Renovate Right booklet.

The second component is certification: any company working on buildings that contain lead paint must be certified. The EPA logo on our home page shows that we have completed this step. In addition, workers must receive training and be individually certified to carry out renovations involving lead paint. Our carpenters have received this training (as have I).

The third component consists of the actual procedures for carrying out the work. If the work involves disturbing more than 6 square feet of lead paint on the interior or 20 square feet on the exterior, the project must follow the guidelines. This includes properly setting up the work area with plastic and sealing off the work area from the rest of the house.  The rules indicate correct procedures for using protective clothing, removal and disposal of lead paint-containing items, and for cleaning the site after the work is complete. They also ban certain techniques, such as grinding or burning lead paint.

These procedures are changing how renovation work is carried out. It's now very important to think ahead and take care of any demolition or invasive work while the containment area is set up. Painters must use different techniques, such as wet sanding. And all of us need to know when protective clothing and respirators must be donned.

The final component of the RRP rules is record keeping.  From now on, when we carry out a renovation project we must keep records that verify the procedures we carried out for notification, testing, setting up, and cleaning. 

A further wrinkle is that some states, including Massachusetts, have taken over the enforcement from the EPA. Contractors in Massachusetts must follow the new regulations written by the state, not the EPA rules. 

There is a lot of anger and confusion in the contracting industry over these rules. First, it is an industry that is slow to change and these rules represent a big change, and some contractors are angry because they hate having to change the way they have always done things. I, for one, am in favor of increased protection from lead paint, so our company intends to fully comply with the rules.  However, some of the anger out there, quite frankly, is justified because the rules are overly complicated and, in some cases, appear to contradict OSHA regulations. Since both the EPA and OSHA have the power to enforce their rules through fines, what is a contractor to do when it is impossible to be in compliance with both?

I think that eventually the added steps put in place to protect both occupants and workers will become second nature. In fact, I predict that the contractors that are in full compliance with the rules will start turning in contractors that are in obvious violation. Just recently a video surfaced on Youtube of a couple of painters in Maine grinding lead paint off a house and creating a cloud of lead dust.  This type of work cannot be tolerated anymore.  It's dangerous to the occupants and to the workers. 

There is a significant cost to comply with these rules between training classes, certification fees, the materials and protective clothing required, and the extra time involved in setting up. Homeowners owe it to themselves to ensure that their contractors are certified, trained, and following the procedures.  Yes, you can get a lower price by hiring a company that ignores the rules, but if they contaminate your home or yard with lead paint dust and endanger you and your family, are those savings worth it?  Ask to see the contractor's certification and the training certificates for each individual worker.  By law now, these must be on site at all times.

Let us know if you have any questions on the impact of these new rules on potential projects at your home. We're always happy to talk!

 

Resources:

EPA's RRP information

Massachusetts Lead Paint Program

 

Comments? Questions? Snide remarks? All are welcome! We'd love to hear from you so please comment on our posts.

Mark Landry is the President of Landmark Services, Inc, the premier old house renovation contracting firms in Massachusetts. He loves old houses and would welcome the opportunity to discuss your renovation, restoration, or addition.

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